Sunday, November 23, 2008

You Know There Is Soccer On Today, Right?

What's the biggest problem with soccer in America today? Alright, don't answer that. The possibilities could be endless. But if you ask me, I would say the biggest problem is that the biggest game of the year, the MLS Cup, takes place on a Sunday afternoon opposite the NFL.

If you are trying to attract even the most casual of fans, why put the game on during any NFL game, the biggest sport in this country? Throw the game on a Wednesday night or something, and air it on ESPN2. I'd rather watch that on some idle Wednesday than repeats of the 2006 World Series of Poker.

But, if you are interested in the culmination of the MLS Cup Playoffs, you can catch it today on ABC at 2:30pm Central Time. It's a matchup between the Columbus Crew (Eastern Conference Champions) and Red Bull New York (Western Conference Champions). New York comes out of the West, even though they are in the East. Something with playoff seeding. Whatever, it works.

So the teams both make their first MLS Cup appearance today, and likely you won't be watching.

That's ok, neither will anyone else.

1 comments:

Pack and Cheese said...

Yeah.. I must admit that even though the Packers aren't playing, I'd still rather watch NFL then soccer..

I think a Tuesday or Wednesday night would be great.. but throw it on network.. no one watches ESPN2 anymore because they know they'll probably just show poker.. POKER IS NOT A SPORT!

Even by a lose defintion of sport: any organized competitive activity in which physical performance is a key factor to victory... Poker isn't even close.

Anyway..I'm cheering for the Columbus Crew... For two reasons.. I always like alliteration...and I don't like using your team name as a sponorship... and if you're going to it shouldn't be Red Bull.. that stuff tastes like piss..

How about the New York Ipecac. WAY more intimidating.. and similar results to Red Bull anyway.

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